CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

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Captain's Log

June 18, 2013

Over fifty years of traveling invisible interplanetary highways around our solar system, and nearly a decade of orbiting Saturn, have bought us to a keen awareness of the celestial bodies in motion around the Sun, and the series of events responsible for their birth and development. We could hardly claim to know the complexity of the planetary systems that lie beyond the asteroid belt, the chronology of the early solar system, or the wide range of extraterrestrial environments where biological processes might be at work, were it not for the many exploratory expeditions that we have mounted to these far-flung worlds.

But perhaps, above all, the greatest, most profound legacy of the quest we have undertaken to understand our origins is perspective...that crystalline, uncorrupted view of our cosmic place that erodes all delusion and confronts us with a powerful recognition of ourselves...a recognition that never fails to move us.

It is surely for this reason that of all the millions of images taken of the worlds in our solar system since the beginning of the space age, those that reach deeper into the human heart than any other, are those of our own home, as it might be seen in the skies of other worlds: small, alone in the blackness of never-ending space and awash in the blue of its blue, blue oceans.

Casssini's first offering to this collection, taken in September 2006 when the spacecraft was placed, for scientific purposes, at significant remove in the shadow of Saturn, has become one of our most beloved images. This is an image that draws gasps from anyone seeing it for the first time. Small wonder: In it, we behold something human eyes had never before seen ... a backlit view of the full resplendent glory of Saturn's rings during an eclipse of the Sun, the smoky blue ring created by the exhalations of the small moon, Enceladus, and ... best of all ... a sight of our planet, Earth, a billion miles in the distance. This is an image without peer, an image that can make one weep with joy, love, concern, an abiding sense of fellowship, and unspeakable awe.

As I have contemplated the inevitable and approaching end of our history-making travels through the Saturn system, I have longed to repeat that remarkable image, make it even better, and turn it into something very special. I imagined making it an opportunity for all of us to appreciate how far we have come in the exploration of our cosmic neighborhood and to celebrate the uniqueness of our lush, life-sustaining world and the preciousness of the life on it. I wanted to repeat that image, only this time, tell all the world about it in advance. Proclaim it to everyone everywhere: 'On this day, at this time, you, the Earth and everybody on it will have their picture taken ... from a billion miles away!' This could be a day, I thought, when all the inhabitants of Earth, in unison, could issue a full-throated, cosmic shout-out and smile a big one for the cameras far, far away.

And so it will be.

On July 19, 2013, the Cassini cameras will be turned to image Saturn and its entire ring system during the planet's eclipse of the sun. In the lower right, among the outer diffuse rings that encircle Saturn, will be a small speck of blue light with all of us on it. A mosaic of images covering the rings from one end to the other, some taken in those filters that are used to make a natural color scene -- that looks like what human eyes would see -- will be taken at this time. Also to be recorded: an image of the highest resolution that we are capable of taking, in which we will find Earth and its moon. One will be a colorless, star-like point of light. The other, of course, will be a pale blue dot.

So, at the appointed time, straighten up, brush your hair, go outside, gather with friends and family, think a thought or two about the starkness of our whereabouts, the beauty of our home planet, the marvel of our existence and the magnificence of our accomplishments. And then ... look up and smile.

Carolyn Porco
Cassini Imaging Team Leader
Director, CICLOPS
Boulder, CO

More Captain's Logs

Alliance Member Comments
graurog2 (Oct 23, 2013 at 10:23 PM):
On the dry lakes, salt flats, most recent image, I, being a landscape painter see signs of intelligent planting of rows of trees ( or digging of lakes?). Locate by starting at high point of globe, track down on 7 o-clock heading, approx 16 cm. There is the appearance of a squareish field with numerous dark shapes that appear to be geometriclly oriented on a 45 degree, l to r, slanted upward. All artists see things but this seems so apparently obvious I had to mention it.
Troubled Tribble (Oct 23, 2013 at 5:52 PM):
The more I see of Titan, the more amazing it becomes. The thing I like the most is the vast distance between Titan and Earth. Titan will remain in it's current state for eons. Except for the occasional visit from a Huygens type probe. Can you imagine what would happen if BP could send tankers there? Perish the thought.
RWBoatwright (Oct 5, 2013 at 5:25 PM):
Hi there! I just joined and find this such a great site with some amazing images. Thank you Carolyn!
martin young (Jul 28, 2013 at 11:43 PM):
Carolyn, you are a poet at heart....a true follower of Carl Sagan. Thank you.
PiperPilot (Jul 22, 2013 at 5:21 PM):
Carolyn I know I was a bit early....but ya gotta do that to get the best seat in the house! I believe it paid off as I can see a slight bit of orange from my shirt in the photos! Which I must say are beautiful!
Goatraslasierra (Jun 23, 2013 at 10:59 AM):
70 min befora +- ;o)
carolyn (CICLOPS) (Jun 22, 2013 at 2:10 PM):
Folks: We are planning 6 weeks to process the big mosaic -- w/ Saturn, rings and Earth -- but hopefully only a few days to do the high res Earth/Moon pic. And only that if we did a good job of determining exposure times. Those pics may need a lot of processing too. Fingers crossed that all goes well!
carolyn (CICLOPS) (Jun 22, 2013 at 2:10 PM):
Folks: We are planning 6 weeks to process the big mosaic -- w/ Saturn, rings and Earth -- but hopefully only a few days to do the high res Earth/Moon pic. And only that if we did a good job of determining exposure times. Those pics may need a lot of processing too. Fingers crossed that all goes well!
beehive (Jun 21, 2013 at 6:34 PM):
I'm going to make sure I'm in one of my most favorite places on earth. Rancho San Antonio openspace preserve. Thanks for sharing this.
dholmes (Jun 21, 2013 at 6:26 AM):
I am personally looking forward to July 19th. Back in 1990 when Carl Sagan requested Voyager 1's camera to photograph Earth. Our "pale blue dot" as it were, only measured 0.12 pixel in size aganist the vast backdrop of space. This was of course just to show how truly small we are in relation to the basic infinitude of space. This time, however, what we will see is our celestial home in relation to our neighbor Saturn. Thus Earth will be visibily more relevant in size as well as aesthetically pleasing to look at...and beyond. Thanks Carolyn for the heads up.
dholmes (Jun 21, 2013 at 6:25 AM):
I am personally looking forward to July 19th. Back in 1990 when Carl Sagan requested Voyager 1's camera to photograph Earth. Our "pale blue dot" as it were, only measured 0.12 pixel in size aganist the vast backdrop of space. This was of course just to show how truly small we are in relation to the basic infinitude of space. This time, however, what we will see is our celestial home in relation to our neighbor Saturn. Thus Earth will be visibily more relevant in size as well as aesthetically pleasing to look at...and beyond. Thanks Carolyn for the heads up.
TelestoMan (Jun 20, 2013 at 10:08 AM):
p.s. sorry for the spelling error ;-)
TelestoMan (Jun 20, 2013 at 10:07 AM):
Hi Caroloyn, Just joined you here (it's @eric_right_now). I just noticed a @DayEarthSmiled Twitter account - is that yours? Cheerful congrats on Richard Branson's interest! I continue to work on NYC possibilities for you on July 19.
carolyn (CICLOPS) (Jun 20, 2013 at 9:22 AM):
PiperPilot: I think you are confused. It's a month away! JULY 19.
PiperPilot (Jun 19, 2013 at 8:56 PM):
Hey Carolyn, I wore my bright orange shirt, so you can find me easily. Hope the pics turn out!

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