CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

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Imaging Diary - Cassini

 
11/16/09
Spotlight on Penelope
PIA11624
 
9/30/09
Bright Penelope
PIA11591
 
5/19/09
Odysseus and Penelope
PIA11495
 
1/1/09
Penelope on Tethys
PIA10547
 
4/4/06
Penelope Crater
PIA08149
 

 

 
11/4/13
Melanthius at Dusk
PIA17138
 
11/14/12
Tethys Polar Maps - June 2012
PIA14932
 
1/31/11
Wisps Before Craters
PIA12751
 
11/30/10
Tethys Polar Maps - August 2010
PIA12799
 
3/3/10
Greek Drama
PIA12581
 

 

 
2/9/10
Tethys Polar Maps - February 2010
PIA11698
 
2/6/07
Odysseus on the Edge
PIA08870
 
9/1/05
Tethys in the Dark
PIA07577
 
7/5/05
Icy Scars
PIA07535
 
4/18/05
Sister moons
PIA06629
 

 






Maps

 
11/14/12
Tethys Polar Maps - June 2012
PIA14932





Newsroom - Looking Ahead

 
Rev214 - Mar 24, 2015
 


 
Rev136 - Aug 3, 2010
 


 
Rev119 - Oct 1, 2009
 







Alliance Member Comments


Tethys ‘Eyes’ Saturn
Robert      
2015-06-15 18:30:29

View all member's comments
This is a rare and stunning image of Thethys because we don't usually see so many of the large craters althogether in such luminous relief. The top one must be Odysseus. The bottom one might be Melanthius but that crater seems too far North. And the fainter big crater in the middle looks like Penelope. Please correct me if I'm wrong about these craters. I've checked the maps and can't figure out any other interpretation. But then this could be because of the Sun-Tethys angle and similar to our own Moon this Cassini image could be a unique angle that throws shallower craters into greater relief. But still, this is a most interesting image of Tethys. It says something to me that seeing even a familiar moon from just a few illumination angles is not enough for me to know it.






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