CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Enceladus Rev 141 Raw Preview

These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's moon Enceladus were taken on Nov. 30, 2010. At closest approach during this targeted flyby, Cassini passed above Enceladus' northern hemisphere at an altitude of only about 50 kilometers (31 miles). This flyby was designed primarily for gravity measurements rather than imaging. The distance of this flyby and a similar flyby in three weeks is the closest Cassini will come to the northern hemisphere surface of Enceladus during the extended Solstice mission.

Nov 30, 2010: Enceladus 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #1 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on November 30, 2010 and received on Earth December 1, 2010.
Nov 30, 2010: Enceladus 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #2 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on November 30, 2010 and received on Earth December 1, 2010.
Nov 30, 2010: Enceladus 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #3 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on November 30, 2010 and received on Earth December 1, 2010.
Nov 30, 2010: Enceladus 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #4 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on November 30, 2010 and received on Earth December 1, 2010.
Nov 30, 2010: Enceladus 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #5 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on November 30, 2010 and received on Earth December 1, 2010.
Nov 30, 2010: Enceladus 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #6 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on November 30, 2010 and received on Earth December 1, 2010.
Alliance Member Comments
kwgm (Dec 3, 2010 at 9:56 AM):
It appears such a cold world, this 'cue ball' of Saturn's moons. Yet we see volcanic jets, their light rising kilometers into space. The Cassini probe continues to prove its worth in the identification and analysis of these ominous and fascinating globes of our Solar System.
Red_dragon (Dec 2, 2010 at 4:00 AM):
Well done!. I tip my hat to you for a new succesful Enceladus flyby and Cassini back to work. Raw images are nothing less than amazing, especially the #1 that looks as Enceladus was a huge cosmic egg and something was cracking it from the inside. Keep up the good work!.
Mercury_3488 (Dec 2, 2010 at 1:05 AM):
Thank you Carolyn,

Will be interesting to see how the gravity profile compared to the far south. I think this will confirm the asymetric nature of the mantle & core of Enceladus.

As this is the first of a 'double header' encounter, will we get hi res imagery of the far north during the next close pass? I think it is important that we do get at least a few frames, as I think seeing this area at high resolution will help explain what has happened & perhaps why.

I still reckon we are looking at a fairly 'recent' major impact cooling off & the south polar terrain to me looks like the surface of paint hardening in a paint pot with a lost lid!!! Also perhaps the 'softened' appearance of the northern craters are due to focussing of siesmic waves, like the Weird Terrain on Mercury opposite the Caloris Basin???

Just a thought.

Great to talk to you again Carolyn. :) Hope life is treating you well.

Andrew Brown.
carolyn (CICLOPS) (Dec 1, 2010 at 4:13 PM):
Andrew: The closest approach period was not dedicated to imaging, but to gravity measurements. Not sure there will be any hi res views of the north polar region.
Mercury_3488 (Dec 1, 2010 at 3:07 PM):
Great image. Of course south is top, west is to the right in this view. Like the shadow cutting through the base of the plumes. There is also a nice crescent view & am looking forward to the high resolution far northern hemisphere views.

This time CA was at 62 North over Enceladus, the first very close Northern Hemisphere pass. Will be interesting to see if at high resolution, the 'softened' profiles of the craters continue down in size & whether or not there are boulders, or boulders that look semi submerged in ice!!!

Andrew Brown.

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