CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Enceladus Rev 153 Raw Preview

These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's moon Enceladus were taken on Sept. 13, 2011.

Sep 16, 2011: Enceladus 'Rev 153' Raw Preview #1 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on September 13, 2011 and received on Earth September 15, 2011.
Sep 16, 2011: Enceladus 'Rev 153' Raw Preview #2 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on September 13, 2011 and received on Earth September 15, 2011.
Sep 16, 2011: Enceladus 'Rev 153' Raw Preview #3 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on September 13, 2011 and received on Earth September 15, 2011.
Sep 16, 2011: Enceladus 'Rev 153' Raw Preview #4 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on September 13, 2011 and received on Earth September 15, 2011.
Sep 16, 2011: Enceladus 'Rev 153' Raw Preview #5 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on September 13, 2011 and received on Earth September 15, 2011.
Sep 16, 2011: Enceladus 'Rev 153' Raw Preview #6 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on September 13, 2011 and received on Earth September 15, 2011.
Sep 16, 2011: Enceladus 'Rev 153' Raw Preview #7 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken on September 13, 2011 and received on Earth September 15, 2011.
Alliance Member Comments
saholz (Sep 17, 2011 at 7:01 AM):
Reminds me of some of the surface features seen on Europa and Ganymede.
j.hemmer (Sep 17, 2011 at 3:57 AM):
Thank you Carolyn - for reminding me every now and again that the world is bigger than what we see in daily life.
At once i am propelled millions of kilometers away looking at some distant moon and everything is in perspective once more.
dholmes (Sep 16, 2011 at 8:27 PM):
Excellent as always for Carolyn and her team. After seeing these wonderful images including past meteor impacts on the surface that quickly refroze. One might think of the article in Nature Geoscience (DOI: 10.1038/NGEO383)concerning amino acids forming after their host meteor impacting on the surface of a distant past Earth. These impacts brought forth an organic soup in Earth's primeval oceans. What kind of possible organic soup might have existed on Enceladus and what now has possibly evolved in that warm ocean below the frozen crust?

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